Poster Abstracts2021-08-05T23:01:22+00:00

Read all abstracts from the New Student Orientation Poster Session

Abstracts are sorted by associated programs.

 

Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Picture welcoming to Sciences Orientation

Biochemistry

“Stressed out” nucleolar proteins: Nucleolin (NCL) phosphorylation in RNA binding and gene expression

Submitted by Anjana Saxena (Biochemistry)

Abstract: Nucleoli are the sub-nuclear “stress-sensing” centers that respond to diverse cellular insults, ranging from molecular damage (e.g., DNA) to metabolic dysregulation and infection. Nucleoli provide a survival advantage in many types of cancers, including leukemia, breast, pancreatic, prostate and lung carcinomas. Migration of nucleolar proteins from nucleoli characterizes nucleolar stress, a hallmark for DNA damage response (DDR). An abundant nucleolar stress-responsive factor, nucleolin (NCL) is an RNA-binding phosphoprotein. Heightened NCL expression is linked to poor prognosis and reduced survival in a variety of cancers. Our research focus is to dissect NCL regulation of cellular DDR through post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. We use multiple cellular models of osteosarcoma, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers to study NCL-mediated DDR. Other projects include role of microbiome in pancreatic and liver diseases.

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Alec Greer’s poster at the Graduate Center

Submitted by Alexander Greer (Chemistry)

Abstract: The Greer laboratory is located at Brooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and has over 20 years of research experience in photochemistry and photobiology. The group utilizes both experimental and theoretical methods to research fundamental aspects of the photosciences, including a focus on controlling and amplifying the production of reactive oxygen species. The group is funded by the NSF, and Prof. Greer is also co-chair of the Committee of Concerned Scientists (CCS), an Associate Editor of Photochemistry & Photobiology (P&P), and President of the American Society for Photobiology (ASP).

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Amy Ikui Lab at Brooklyn College

Submitted by Amy Ikui (Biology)

Abstract: Ikui Lab studies cell cycle in eukaryotes. We aim to understand how cells cordinate DNA replication and ell division in order to maintain genome integrity. Our lab uses S. cerevisiae and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system to study a moelcular mechanism of cell cycle control. Please download the the PDF to view the poster presentation.

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Bioinspired Nanotechnology at CUNY ASRC

Submitted by Rein Ulijn (Chemistry)

Abstract: The poster summarizes research on bioinspired nanotechnology in the Ulijn Group at CUNY ASRC and Hunter College. The fundamental research question that drives our work is to what extent the building blocks and chemical reactions and interactions of life can be repurposed and simplified to produce new materials and modalities that can exploit, modify or enhance biological functions. Applications are sought in production of materials, systems and sensors for biomedicine and future bio-degradable devices for sustainable technology.

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Biology Program at Brooklyn College

Submitted by Brooklyn College-Biology Program (Biology)

Abstract: Faculty at Brooklyn College Biology Department conduct research in diverse range of area in microbiology, cancer biology and development. Brooklyn College is located in the middle of Brooklyn ; Flatbush Avenue at end of 2, 5 subway station. Please visit us and contact me if you are interested: Amy Ikui, Graduate Deputy Chair, Brooklyn College (AIkui@brooklyn.cuny.edu)

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Biology

“Stressed out” nucleolar proteins: Nucleolin (NCL) phosphorylation in RNA binding and gene expression

Submitted by Anjana Saxena (Biochemistry)

Abstract: Nucleoli are the sub-nuclear “stress-sensing” centers that respond to diverse cellular insults, ranging from molecular damage (e.g., DNA) to metabolic dysregulation and infection. Nucleoli provide a survival advantage in many types of cancers, including leukemia, breast, pancreatic, prostate and lung carcinomas. Migration of nucleolar proteins from nucleoli characterizes nucleolar stress, a hallmark for DNA damage response (DDR). An abundant nucleolar stress-responsive factor, nucleolin (NCL) is an RNA-binding phosphoprotein. Heightened NCL expression is linked to poor prognosis and reduced survival in a variety of cancers. Our research focus is to dissect NCL regulation of cellular DDR through post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. We use multiple cellular models of osteosarcoma, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers to study NCL-mediated DDR. Other projects include role of microbiome in pancreatic and liver diseases.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Amy Ikui Lab at Brooklyn College

Submitted by Amy Ikui (Biology)

Abstract: Ikui Lab studies cell cycle in eukaryotes. We aim to understand how cells cordinate DNA replication and ell division in order to maintain genome integrity. Our lab uses S. cerevisiae and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system to study a moelcular mechanism of cell cycle control. Please download the the PDF to view the poster presentation.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Biology Program at Brooklyn College

Submitted by Brooklyn College-Biology Program (Biology)

Abstract: Faculty at Brooklyn College Biology Department conduct research in diverse range of area in microbiology, cancer biology and development. Brooklyn College is located in the middle of Brooklyn ; Flatbush Avenue at end of 2, 5 subway station. Please visit us and contact me if you are interested: Amy Ikui, Graduate Deputy Chair, Brooklyn College (AIkui@brooklyn.cuny.edu)

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Biophysics of Neurodegenerative Disorders

Submitted by Hyungsik Lim (Biology)

Abstract: We are interested in understanding neurodegenerative disorders from a biophysical perspective, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) as the primary tool for imaging the intravital mouse brain (Lim, Front. Mol. Bio. 2019). Innovating advanced imaging modalities has been the theme of his research since postdoctoral training. While at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Lim demonstrated novel swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging the human retina in vivo, achieving the record for the highest speed (Lim et al., Opt. Express 2006). In the laboratory of Dr. Watt W. Webb at Cornell University, where MPM was invented, he studied the fundamental limits in the miniaturization of MPM toward clinical endoscopy. Now in his lab at CUNY Hunter College, Lim and his colleagues study novel concepts for elucidating neurodegenerative disorders including glaucoma. It was also in the Webb lab that his research interest on single-molecule biophysics began. Recently during a sabbatical year 2017-2018, Lim was a visiting associate professor in the laboratory of R. H. Singer working on intravital imaging of single-molecule gene expression, which he continues at CUNY.

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Chemogenetic Inhibition of Midbrain Dopamine Neurons During Object Exploration Enhances Future Novel Object Discrimination

Submitted by Rhonda Kolaric (Biology)

Abstract: It is well established that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral midbrain signal novelty by increasing their bursting activity, while decreasing it after repeated inconsequential stimulus presentations. Thus, the lack of DA neuron burst activity is a physiological signature that a particular stimulus has become familiar. We hypothesized that decreasing DA neuron activity while animals explore objects for the first time enhances familiarization and improves subsequent novel object discrimination.

We showed that novel object recognition (NOR) depends on the amount of pre-exposure to the familiar object, such that two familiarization sessions over two days produce robust novelty discrimination, while one familiarization session does not produce novelty discrimination during the NOR task. This lack of NOR reflects a stage of equal attention allocated to both stimuli, could be interpreted as a weakened memory of the previously seen familiar stimulus.

To investigate whether decreasing DA neuron activity increases familiarity and prompts gain-of-function in NOR, we chemogenetically inhibited DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) during the familiarization session of NOR paradigm that results in poor novelty discrimination. We injected an AAV flp-dependent hM4D into the VTA of TH-flp transgenic mice to selectively inhibit TH-positive DA neurons. The virus was activated via injection of Clozapine N-oxide dihydrochloride (i.p.) 30 minutes before trial. We found that inhibiting DA neurons during the familiarization phase resulted in enhanced novelty discrimination in experimental animals compared to controls, while inhibiting DA neurons after familiarization does not, suggesting that suppressing DA activity ameliorates novelty discrimination by enhancing familiarity.

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Biology, Neuroscience (NS)|

Chemistry

Alec Greer’s poster at the Graduate Center

Submitted by Alexander Greer (Chemistry)

Abstract: The Greer laboratory is located at Brooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and has over 20 years of research experience in photochemistry and photobiology. The group utilizes both experimental and theoretical methods to research fundamental aspects of the photosciences, including a focus on controlling and amplifying the production of reactive oxygen species. The group is funded by the NSF, and Prof. Greer is also co-chair of the Committee of Concerned Scientists (CCS), an Associate Editor of Photochemistry & Photobiology (P&P), and President of the American Society for Photobiology (ASP).

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Bioinspired Nanotechnology at CUNY ASRC

Submitted by Rein Ulijn (Chemistry)

Abstract: The poster summarizes research on bioinspired nanotechnology in the Ulijn Group at CUNY ASRC and Hunter College. The fundamental research question that drives our work is to what extent the building blocks and chemical reactions and interactions of life can be repurposed and simplified to produce new materials and modalities that can exploit, modify or enhance biological functions. Applications are sought in production of materials, systems and sensors for biomedicine and future bio-degradable devices for sustainable technology.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Choi Lab Poster

Submitted by Junyong Choi (Chemistry)

Abstract: he overall goal of my research is to discover specific, target-directed therapeutics for human diseases. This goal will be accomplished by applying a multidisciplinary approach that includes organic synthesis, medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, and computational chemistry and biology. In particular, synthesis of rationally designed inhibitors generated by using computer-aided design techniques is applied to the discovery of novel therapeutic agents. My research projects include (1) Structure-guided discovery of allosteric modulators of kinases; (2) Structure-guided development of specific inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases; and (3) Development of specific inhibitors of kinases by applying cheminformatics and structural bioinformatics. The discovery and techniques established in the Choi lab advance the chemical and biological science in medical research and drug discovery and facilitate understanding in human diseases for the development of therapeutics.

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Computational Biodesign and Synthetic Biology

Submitted by Ronald Koder (Physics)

Abstract: Synthetic Biologists are re-imagining the proteins that do the work of living cells as small modular devices, similar to electronic components like resistors and capacitors, that can be reassembled into novel biological functions and systems – much like electrical engineers assemble large numbers of simple electronic components into devices like computers and cellular phones. This is a significant change in the biological paradigm, and it will have as large an effect on people’s everyday lives decades from now as the development of molecular biology twenty years ago is having on our lives today. Like the physicists of the 40s and 50s, who were focused on the design of simple electronic components like transistors and diodes, my lab uses computational protein design to create new biological components, not yet observed in nature, to further extend the possibilities of synthetic biology. Starting from scratch, we create novel proteins that offer new functions or physical properties and then integrate them with natural proteins, other designed proteins or non-protein materials to create new enzymes, materials and organisms with applications in medicine, defense, ‘green’ industrial catalysis and green energy production. We believe that this novel combination – proteins designed de novo coupled with naturally occurring proteins – will enable us to move beyond the confines of biology and help us to solve many of mankind’s problems.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Computational biophysics of the proteins that store the cell’s energy

Submitted by Marilyn Gunner (Physics)

Abstract: We use computational methods to study protein structures to see how they work. We focus on the proteins that capture energy from food and sunlight to form an electrochemical gradient across the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria. The gradient arises from differences in the concentration of protons and ions across the membranes. Computational methods start with the protein structure and find connections in the protein that allow protons to pass through the protein and tell us the energy of each step of proton transfer through the protein. These studies have connections to fields as diverse as drug design and solar energy.
We are an interdisciplinary lab. You don’t need to come in knowing about proteins or any programing skill. You will have an opportunity to learn these in the lab. Students from Physics, Chemistry and Biochemistry have been very successful in the lab.

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Computer Aided Drug Discovery

Submitted by Tom Kurtzman (Chemistry)

Abstract: Our group uses computer simulations and the mathematics of statistical mechanics to improve our understanding of the molecular recognition between small molecule drugs and their biomolecular targets. We use this better understanding to build computational tools that aid in the discovery and rational optimization of new pharmaceutical compounds. Successful researchers in the group are comfortable in biophysics ,calculus, statistics, coding (C++, Python, and Tcl), and are fluent with the Linux OS. Research applicants should either have these skills or be dedicated to acquiring them.

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Physics

BDNYC

Submitted by Jackie Faherty (Physics)

Abstract: The BDNYC Research Group focuses on the observational study of brown dwarfs. Brown dwarfs are celestial bodies that are in between stars like our Sun and giant planets like Jupiter. Brown dwarfs are star-like in that they form like stars, but unlike stars, they cool over time and they have radii, masses, and temperatures similar to giant planets. The primary goals of our research is to measure the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs (e.g., mass, temperature, age, chemical composition) and to identify the observables that distinguish giant planets and brown dwarfs from each other. At right is an artist’s rendition of three brown dwarfs compared to the Sun (left) and Jupiter (right). Brown dwarfs have masses from 13–75 MJupiter and temperatures less than 2200 Kelvin.

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Physics|

Biomedical Photonics Laboratory: Wave control, optical imaging across scales, and diagnostics

Submitted by Min Xu (Physics)

Abstract: The BPL’s research is known for addressing fundamental and pressing problems in biophotonics and novel optical spectroscopy, microscopy, and imaging technologies for biology and medicine. Notable contributions include: the first analytical cumulant solution to radiative transfer which governs fundamentally how light migrates in tissue, the first Monte Carlo method for simulating light propagation and interference in random media using electric field, the first correct tissue light scattering model, the first correct coherent dynamic microcirculation model for neuro- and non-neuro-imaging of hemodynamics, diffuse optical imaging with independent component analysis (OPTICA), photonic pathology with quantitative phase and chemometric microscopies, and in vivo optical biomedical imaging and disease diagnosis with structured light. Current focus is wave control in scattering media, quantitative optical imaging/microscopies across scales, and diagnostics with deep learning.

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Physics|

Biophysics of Neurodegenerative Disorders

Submitted by Hyungsik Lim (Biology)

Abstract: We are interested in understanding neurodegenerative disorders from a biophysical perspective, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) as the primary tool for imaging the intravital mouse brain (Lim, Front. Mol. Bio. 2019). Innovating advanced imaging modalities has been the theme of his research since postdoctoral training. While at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Lim demonstrated novel swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging the human retina in vivo, achieving the record for the highest speed (Lim et al., Opt. Express 2006). In the laboratory of Dr. Watt W. Webb at Cornell University, where MPM was invented, he studied the fundamental limits in the miniaturization of MPM toward clinical endoscopy. Now in his lab at CUNY Hunter College, Lim and his colleagues study novel concepts for elucidating neurodegenerative disorders including glaucoma. It was also in the Webb lab that his research interest on single-molecule biophysics began. Recently during a sabbatical year 2017-2018, Lim was a visiting associate professor in the laboratory of R. H. Singer working on intravital imaging of single-molecule gene expression, which he continues at CUNY.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Complex Networks and Data Science at the Makse Lab

Submitted by Hernan Makse (Physics)

Abstract: The Makse Lab at the Levich Institute and Physics Department of City College of New York is interested in the theoretical understanding of Complex Systems from a Statistical Physics viewpoint. We are working towards the development of new emergent laws for complex systems, ranging from brain networks and biological networks to social systems. We treat these complex systems from a unified theoretical approach using concepts from statistical mechanics, network and optimization theory, machine learning, and big-data science that we have developed in our studies of disordered systems in physics.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Physics|

Computational Biodesign and Synthetic Biology

Submitted by Ronald Koder (Physics)

Abstract: Synthetic Biologists are re-imagining the proteins that do the work of living cells as small modular devices, similar to electronic components like resistors and capacitors, that can be reassembled into novel biological functions and systems – much like electrical engineers assemble large numbers of simple electronic components into devices like computers and cellular phones. This is a significant change in the biological paradigm, and it will have as large an effect on people’s everyday lives decades from now as the development of molecular biology twenty years ago is having on our lives today. Like the physicists of the 40s and 50s, who were focused on the design of simple electronic components like transistors and diodes, my lab uses computational protein design to create new biological components, not yet observed in nature, to further extend the possibilities of synthetic biology. Starting from scratch, we create novel proteins that offer new functions or physical properties and then integrate them with natural proteins, other designed proteins or non-protein materials to create new enzymes, materials and organisms with applications in medicine, defense, ‘green’ industrial catalysis and green energy production. We believe that this novel combination – proteins designed de novo coupled with naturally occurring proteins – will enable us to move beyond the confines of biology and help us to solve many of mankind’s problems.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

Computational biophysics of the proteins that store the cell’s energy

Submitted by Marilyn Gunner (Physics)

Abstract: We use computational methods to study protein structures to see how they work. We focus on the proteins that capture energy from food and sunlight to form an electrochemical gradient across the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria. The gradient arises from differences in the concentration of protons and ions across the membranes. Computational methods start with the protein structure and find connections in the protein that allow protons to pass through the protein and tell us the energy of each step of proton transfer through the protein. These studies have connections to fields as diverse as drug design and solar energy.
We are an interdisciplinary lab. You don’t need to come in knowing about proteins or any programing skill. You will have an opportunity to learn these in the lab. Students from Physics, Chemistry and Biochemistry have been very successful in the lab.

Download the PDF to view a larger version.

Visit the lab website.

Contact the submitter with questions or to request an accessible version of this poster.

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